Is working from home as great as we think?

Many remote workers reported a happiness level approximately 20% higher than in-office workers, yet over a quarter of workers admit it may not be the most constructive use of their time.

UK workers are increasingly expecting a hybrid environment, but could face 20% pay cuts as well as less opportunity for more experienced colleagues to pass on skills to younger members of staff.

The up's and down's of working from home

The UK has seen people adapt more eagerly to hybrid work than other parts of the world. As research indicates approximately a third of people are splitting their time between the office and home, with the volume of people commuting to work remaining below pre-pandemic levels. UK workers are increasingly expecting a hybrid environment, with their daily work commute a major off-putting factor of full-time office work, along with the increased family time part of the appeal of working from home.

Although this is makes working from home appealing, it often comes at a cost. Law firm, Stephenson Harwood are offering full time remote work for a 20% pay cut, with other companies proposing similar offers.

According to LinkedIn, many remote workers reported a happiness level approximately 20% higher than in-office workers, this was most evident when in millennials compared to other generations.

However, working from home is not for everyone – especially if you get your energy from working around others. If everyone is working from home, then this can negatively impact people entering the workforce as there is less opportunity for more experienced colleagues to pass on skills to younger members of staff.

Although research has found that over half of British workers (55%) still expect to spend fewer days in the office per week, and more than a third wanting to come and go as they please (35%), they admit it may not be the most constructive use of their time as over a quarter said they found connection problems during video calls (29%).

According to the Chief Executive of property firm JLL, the current candidate-led market means people can demand flexibility and are being “treated like pop stars”. He believes in-person working is key to “resolving conflict” and says people should work in the office around three days a week.

There is no “one size fits all” approach to office/remote working. According to Microsoft’s Work Trend Index, 57% of remote employees have considered a shift to hybrid work, whereas 51% of hybrid employees have considered a shift to remote work.

What is the right split of remote/office work for you or your business? Do you think the benefits of remote work outweigh the cons?